Was Custer assassinated?

Publié le par custerwest

Was the betrayal planned? Disturbing elements of the Custer story
WAS CUSTER ASSASSINATED?
original article by custerwest.org member Jessie Reil
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The easiest way to hide a murder is to never have anyone suspect that anyone has been murdered at all by doing it so in plain site that no one would even think of it.

I never once contemplated in a sea of over 200 dead murdered bodies in the rolling hills of Montana on June 25, 1876 that there was anything but northern plains Indians being killed by legal mandate by the United State government on the weapons of the 7th Cavalry and that same Cavalry dying under the plains Indians government which included murderous uncivilized tactics. Yet in examining the living, I soon became puzzled in evidence that indeed murder had occurred and that the Sioux, Cheyenne etc... were willing patsies taking the blame for a murder they would die for, suffer for and still be struggling with blaming General George Armstrong Custer as not being murdered enough by them, but still having to be dragged around the hill and kicked a few times over their own deluded leaders catastrophic war which Sitting Bull to Crazy Horse all knew was lost already and was only their throwing a tantrum of power in getting their own suffering people killed.

Hidden in this murder of George Armstrong Custer and over 200 Americans and quite probably 500 dead Indians was an assassination which no one has ever noticed.

So let us begin in the profiles of the characters on that day and the years following in examining behaviors which in investigative forensics reveal a plot was being carried out as grand as the one which assassinated Abraham Lincoln.

Captain Benteen

01-benteen2-rpf.jpgOur first subject hidden in the scowling tempest of time is one Capt. Frederick Benteen. In Benteen, we find the first hint that something much larger was brewing on that day in June when certain factors come to light:
1. Benteen was to ordered to scout south of the Little Big Horn to ascertain if any Indians were escaping and to attack them. He was on this scout ordered to report his findings to General Custer. He did not.
2. Benteen was ordered to bring up extra ammo in a quick manner. He instead kept his troops moving slowing and then stopped to water the horses for a time which was so long that the other officers wondered why he was keeping them out of the fight and to the point that Capt. Weir actually rode to advance with his troop as Benteen was in no way following orders.
3. Capt. Weir would again complain to both Maj. Reno and Capt. Benteen that they needed to go to General Custer, but was denied and went anyway with his troop following.
Capt. Benteen would follow a half an hour later in "support", but upon reaching Weir Point and seeing the last half hour of a 3 hour battle before him, ordered a "Retreat".
Lt. Godfrey would report that there was no fight. Benteen just retreated.

The evidence which an investigator would immediately notice is Capt. Benteen was under certain orders which he violated. There was no reason to stop at Maj. Reno's location as Reno only had 7 wounded and yet Benteen sedately remained according to Lt. Godfrey's watch almost 3 hours without any enemy activity and the sounds of firing which all knew was General Custer's battalions in the distance.
In each of the instances, it could be reasoned that Benteen was angry as he often appeared to be in this instance over General Custer giving the attack to Reno, but when one reasons that this was a military war where not following the expressed orders would get soldiers killed one soon realizes Benteen in knowing he would be court martialled and perhaps executed whose penalties would make him follow orders, instead acted in every instance as someone who knew General Custer would not be a problem in Benteen's not following orders and whoever was in the chain of command would not make any consequences for Benteen's failure to carry out orders.

Benteen's post mortem June 25th letter to his wife was equally bizarre in that unlike Lt. Varnum who naturally like all did was distraught over the entire losses to the Custer family in his knowing them, Benteen instead told his wife to keep the WW. Cooke memo as it was "valuable", spoke of seeing the dead officers on Last Stand Hill all laid out like anyone would know them (Tom Custer had his head bashed in according to Lt. Godfrey and was unrecognizable), told his wife of the promotions which would benefit all now that the others were dead and then lied stating that, "Custer's troops yelled and that is what alerted the Indians" when he knew sound did not travel distances of miles on the plains.
It would be Capt. Benteen along with Maj. Reno whose only voices sent out the "word" that it was General Custer's fault the massacre occurred knowing very well a military investigation and the eye witnesses to their strange behavior would show otherwise.
Their first dispatches caused the greatest consternation to both General Phil Sheridan and General Alfred Terry in trying to defend General Custer.
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Benteen told his wife to keep the WW. Cooke memo as it was "valuable", spoke of seeing the dead officers on Last Stand Hill all laid out like anyone would know them 
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In recapping, Capt. Benteen, his entire active posture that day was bravery in saving his own life at Reno Hill, but in all cases he was a person who acted as if George Custer would be no one he would have to answer again to and that he knew in Custer dying no one in command would ever question his actions.

Major Reno

Subject 2 is Maj. Marcus Reno who in the Civil War was wounded and promoted for bravery. This does not at all seem to match the Marcus Reno in the days before the Little Big Horn. He proved quite capable of scouting out the Sioux on the Rosebud, but instead of following them up in attacking them, he instead started for the Terry base camp and Terry, himself ordered him to halt as General Custer would join him and take up the pursuit.
What must be noted in Reno are his action on the scout which have been overlooked. Reno was under specific orders to scout down the Powder River, across the headwaters of smaller streams and end up on the headwaters of the Tongue River where he would descend it to meet General Custer and the left wing of the 7th Cavalry.
Instead Maj. Reno, disobeyed orders and went onto the Rosebud River where the Indians were camped, but perplexed General Custer as he wrote to his wife, Elizabeth, in not following up and attacking as valuable time had been lost. General Terry and General Custer were highly concerned that Reno had alerted the Indians.

On the day of the Little Big Horn Battle, Maj. Reno was given the honor of the charge. Yet in accounts Maj. Reno stopped his charge on a sleeping Indian camp which had been celebrating the night before, because the "ground was growing Indians". The camp was still in surprise and chaos when Maj. Reno stopped the attack which lost the initiative in creating more chaos.
Reno then went on the defensive in a stand of timber after his Ree scouts fled. Records show Reno had a quite defendable position and it was at that time that his command was dealing with what would be termed the Chief Gaul and Cheyenne forces which while encircling were not that numerous for his battalion not to deal with on defensive grounds.
It was at this point that Bloody Knife was killed and his brains sprayed upon Maj. Reno and what could be seen as a fit of panic left part of his forces there and fled the field throwing away his own pistols.

The only reason Reno's command was saved from "only" having 1/3rd killed in flight is General Custer had opened his attack and Gaul's forces went to the north end of the camp to start the attack there.

Lt. Godfrey reported Reno was excited when he rode up with Benteen's command. A better term was he had been "run by the Indians".
For the next 3 hours without any Indians attacking them, Reno and Benteen stayed in position. Reno would first waste time looking for a dead trooper and then state he could not move to Custer's position until packs were brought up. When packs were brought up, he then stated he could not move due to the wounded. The wounded were only 7 men and were later secured on the Weir movement in the hills in safety.
Other troopers would relate Reno screaming at Weir not to go and try and find General Custer, relate he hid in a hole all day and that an old guard in the night stated Reno was drinking and making sarcastic remarks about General Custer in "where he was now".
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Other troopers would relate Reno screaming at Weir not to go and try and find General Custer, relate he hid in a hole all day and that an old guard in the night stated Reno was drinking and making sarcastic remarks about General Custer in "where he was now".
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Troopers heard as did Reno, General Custer's troopers firing off 2 distress mass volleys as Lt. Godfrey reported. Godfrey also said the troopers with him were stating, "Reno had better do something or General Custer is going to be after him with a pointed stick".

Maj. Reno knew very well he had disobeyed orders in stopping the attack for his said reasons of the Indian force was too large, yet in the next breath he readily fled for his life with a smaller force of Cavalry through a much greater assembled force of Indians now ready for battle.
Upon reaching safety, his first duty was to return to where he knew General Custer was operating, report and aid him with his full support.
Yet history reveals he stayed in position knowing a battle was going on in hearing it and later in testimony concerning it changed his original statements and lied on the witness stand with it all being "white washed" by higher ups who knew full well Reno had not obeyed orders and then lied.

As General Custer fought for over 3 hours on open ground at least 1,500 Indians, Maj. Reno could have charged not more than 500 Indians and certainly in a perfect defensive position aiding General Custer's battalions held his river ground until General Custer drove off the northern warriors and captured the women and children forcing the warriors to surrender and keeping the entire command safe from attack which was accomplished on the Washita.

Enlisted men it is stated were coerced and signatures forged by Maj. Reno and Capt. Benteen to state they had saved all their lives that day.

It is into this court martial of Maj. Reno for stalking and harassing a married woman after the battle of the Little Big Horn, where he approached Capt. Benteen in attempting to get him to lie about the stalking.
Capt. Benteen at this point refused to be a part of this, but this interaction like the Reno Court Martial reveals that Maj. Reno had set a known pattern that he could depend upon in matters which were in Benteen's interest that Benteen would lie and cover up events. This is why Reno chose Benteen out of all officers and men to try and create an alibi over the stalked married woman, because Reno had carried out a deception on a greater level before with Benteen's help.

It should be noted in this that Reno did not retaliate at all against Benteen for his refusal to aid on a petty matter of his stalking a woman. This means that it was in Reno's interest not to antagonize Benteen as a greater deception was being covered up, that being the death of George Armstrong Custer who Benteen would later refer to in their death as "that Custer gang".
Others would refer to them as the Custer family as 3 brothers, a brother in law and a nephew were slaughtered that day.

Maj. Marcus Reno would be promoted to command of the 7th Cavalry on the death of General Custer.

Lieutenant George Wallace

Subject 2A is necessary to include as he is not a major character, but the sort of which a plan must always have in the "chronic whisperer" laying the foundation of the "yellow journalism propaganda" which steers history.
The subject is Lt. George Wallace. In the memoirs of Lt. Godfrey, Godfrey relates two puzzling "signs" which Wallace called to his attention. This was strange as one reading letters of the time hardly had the people writing them ever mentioning omens.
Wallace would after hear the "Custer Talk" where he laid out the reason for the 7th Cavalry standing alone and for their being lightly armed, tell Godfrey out of the blue, "Godfrey, I think General Custer is going to die as I never heard him talk like that before".
Further after the battle, Wallace would approach Godfrey and call attention to him an event Godfrey had forgotten in the Company Standard was blown down twice in the wind and Wallace would tell Godfrey afterwards, "I knew we were going to be defeated when that happened".

Lt. George Wallace would be rewarded in the death of General Custer as Adjutant to Maj. Reno.

The reason this is crucial is for the fact when Reno was face court martial for stalking and harassing a married woman of one of his officers, a Mrs. Bell, Reno picked 2 men of the 7th Cavalry to lie for him to cover it up. One as noted was Capt. Benteen, the other not by coincidence was the ever present steerer of "Custer was born to die", Lt. George Wallace.


President Grant

450px-Ulysses-Grant-1870-1880.jpgThe third major subject to be examined is the third person who immediately went public laying all blame for the Little Big Horn on General George Custer. That person being President Grant.
President Grant had been furious over a growing embarrassment of his family from his son, Fred, being arrested by General Custer for being drunk on the 1874 Black Hills Expedition to Grant's brother in the Indian Ring kickbacks coming out of the Grant Administration in Sec. Belknap's wife and second wife (the first wife's sister) both selling trader rights to pedal armaments to the Indians and supply all military posts.
General Custer would give testimony before Congress on this. His wife, Elizabeth, in letters would warn and worry over him making powerful enemies, but George Custer would live by Lincoln's words, "With charity toward all and malice toward none".

President Grant would retaliate against General Custer in first claiming he left Washington without official leave being challenged by Sec. of War William Tucumseh Sherman and President Grant himself.
General Custer appealed to General Phil Sheridan war department commander in the coming Indian war who allowed Custer to continue on to his post by explaining to Washington in a telegram that General Custer had indeed called on Sherman twice and left his card and had tried to meet with the President, but was denied even after General Custer sent a personal letter to the President.
When General Custer reached Minnesota and his immediate superior's headquarters, General Terry, to report on operations, he was stunned to find out that President Grant had retaliated even more in removing General Custer not only from the coming Indian campaign, but from the head of the 7th Cavalry.
General Terry, who had absolutely no field experience in Indian warfare, immediately did something outstanding in having the President's order's changed in General Custer's plea to at least have the face saving honor of riding out with his own men on the summer campaign.
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General Terry, who had absolutely no field experience in Indian warfare, immediately did something outstanding in having the President's order's changed in General Custer's plea to at least have the face saving honor of riding out with his own men on the summer campaign.
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In the end, General Terry was placed in command by the Grant Administration over summer campaign where Terry being an able desk officer knew nothing of finding paths in the wilderness nor in fighting Indians.
To this, the limping commander, Gibbons was to lead another column and General Crook from the Platte department who had led a complete failure in the winter campaign of 1875 against the hostiles was to join the Custer column.

General George Crook

456px-George-Crook---Brady-Handy.jpgIt should be noted at this point that while General Crook was a fine commanding officer, his failing in the winter campaign is what set in motion the eventual disaster of the Little Big Horn as he also failed in defeating an attack from Crazy Horse on the Rosebud River and then removed himself from the field with General Terry, Gibbon or Custer not being aware his support was not to arrive.

No evidence has ever explained why General Crook, who was ordered to act in consort with the Gibbon and Custer columns was moving exactly up the Rosebud River valley alone where the Indians were massed much earlier than the General Terry command could reach the area. It also requires examination as to why General Crook had not been kept advised of the General Terry and General Custer operational plans which General Sheridan, General Sherman and President Grant had to have been privy too.

The account of Trooper John Finerty at the Battle of the Rosebud reveals that General Crook was decidedly acting alone and not in concert with General Terry. The memoir of Trooper Finerty in fact states that General Crook retired from the field after the battle of the Rosebud, because he felt his force was small and he had not faced all of the Indians encamped ahead of him.
No where in this Summer Campaign was General Crook acting as if he were under orders for a combined operation. He acted alone, was fought to a stalemate alone, retired from the field alone and made no apparent urgent dispatches to the Department of the Platte in trying to warn General Terry of his withdrawal.
If one observes the operation, General Crook, after this scouts informed him the Indians were on the Rosebud, hurriedly went out to engage them, was surprised by their attack and in every way derailed General Terry and General Custer's plans of striking the Indians with a united force on the Rosebud.

Added to this oddity of attack, Trooper Anson Mills in his memoirs states General Crook took the command west and not east and hunted in the Big Horn mountains. Trooper Mills states he climbed to a lookout and saw "big fight had occurred" by the smoke in the distance. Later on June 30th, he found Pvt's Bell, Stewart and Evans of 7th Infantry, General Gibbons commanding, ordered to bring a dispatch from General Terry to General Crook that General Custer's command had been massacred.
So much has been made of  the week after the battle it took for General Terry to receive word of General Crook's retreat and yet within 2 days of the Little Big Horn, General Terry sent word to General Crook knowing where his entire command was, but not one dispatch from General Crook to General Terry is reported as being sent. The General was then "looked up" having been hunting in the Big Horn mountains and his animals were loaded down with game.
General Terry knew where General Crook was by the actions of sending 3 messengers from General Gibbon's command.
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Within 2 days of the Little Big Horn, General Terry sent word to General Crook knowing where his entire command was, but not one dispatch from General Crook to General Terry is reported as being sent. The General was then "looked up" having been hunting in the Big Horn mountains and his animals were loaded down with game.
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As an additional note for consideration, General Crook was a fine Indian fighter in the early days of Indian warfare when the Indians were stampeded easily or could be brought into conflict on military terms. His later years were marked by failure as in the 1875 campaign where one of his subordinates attacked the very Indians who would cause the Custer massacre and he simply withdrew before General Crook could come up allowing them to escape.
General Crook would then retreat to headquarters citing it being too cold, but the very next winter's 1876 campaign had the military operating as Col. Richard Irving Dodge related in the Black Hills area of 40 below zero temperatures.
It was during this winter that the Sioux and Cheyenne would call the soldiers, Walking Heaps, as they were covered in buffalo coats to keep from freezing and carried out attacks.

The cover-up

shadow-20man.pngIn noting these 3 characters, one notices all worked in support of making public the conclusion that General Custer was to blame for the Little Big Horn when later General of the Army, Nelson Appleton Miles found in definitive study that General Custer did everything exactly the way it should have been accomplished. He noted that the same number of Indians which wiped out Custer's unaided position could not defeat Reno and Benteen's command of 400 men. The Indian numbers were not that superior, it was that General Custer had not had the resources nor soldier strength necessary to provide for an offense of defense he was counting on.
It will behoove one to be remind one at this point that the fine officers of Weir and Godfrey were both with Benteen and the battalion he commanded would have given General Custer the troop strength equal to that of Reno Hill which proved a success.
It only would have taken 200 more troopers who were ordered to come to Custer's position.

In fact, Indian chiefs at the time were highly concerned they were about to be pinned between Custer's column and what they thought would be the soon advancing column of Reno and Benteen. That is the order of battle everyone expected, but Reno and Benteen both did not follow orders.

It is in this forensic and profiling data that a sound determination can be concluded that a Coroner's Inquest should be opened to ascertain the stage of events which provide the motive and opportunity for the assassination of George Armstrong Custer hidden within the murderous rampage blamed upon the willing plains Indians.

thumbnail.jpgCapt. Benteen's actions that day all point to the conclusion before the battle was engaged that he knew General Custer would be dead and not a problem for his disobeying orders. Benteen also by actions showed no concern that superiors would court martial or execute him for disobeying orders which caused a mass slaughter of fellow soldiers he had served with for 10 years.
His letter to his wife was written in a state of mind of hiding evidence, knowing it was valuable and speaking of promotion and using weak lies to blame General Custer for a death which Capt. Benteen knowingly aided in.
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Capt. Benteen's actions that day all point to the conclusion before the battle was engaged that he knew General Custer would be dead and not a problem for his disobeying orders.
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Maj. Reno's actions could be regarded as cowardice, but his repeated lies and knowing the Indian strength was not what he said it was when he called the attack off, reveal more than cowardice at work.
Reno appears not as the person in the Civil War past, but as someone who once reaching safety, knowingly that General Custer's command was in 3 hours of battle conspired with Capt. Benteen to leave General Custer and his troopers to face a known 1,500 Indian warriors in an exposed position where he was expecting support so he would remain in an offensive posture wasting resources before entering a defensive posture when most of his command was dead.
If one remembers that Reno also, moved to the Indians on the Rosebud destroying the original General and General Custer plan, (Note, General Terry and General Custer originally had intended knowing the Indians were camped on the Rosebud River were to have General Custer descend the Tongue River, move on the trail Reno alerted the Indians of cavalry presence to the Rosebud, and then the 7th was to move down the Rosebud while the infantry and 2nd Cavalry units moved up the Rosebud in a short march in a hammer and anvil operation.)
This was the perfect battle plan which Reno deliberately sabotaged as much as General Crook in his falling back on the Rosebud attack. It can not be fully explained how Reno or Cook in being both in the Rosebud valley did not find traces of each other nor scouts actually have bumped into each command.
Reno deliberately destroyed the perfect battle plan on the Rosebud, and then the fall back plan had to be created which now shows horrid faults in General Terry had a fast moving 7th Cavalry depending upon in a huge area a slow moving infantry under Col. Gibbon having to march an incredible distance on the Big Horn River to rendezvous.

If one simply researches the General Terry and General Custer original battle plan it was perfect and it also relieves General Custer of any blame he was attacking "early" for vain glory reasons. General Custer was stuck with an inferior plan, because his superior plan of working in one river valley of the Rosebud in consort with the infantry was thwarted by deliberate actions of Marcus Reno.
A reporter, Mark Kellogg who died with General Custer would relate in a dispatch he filed on June 21st, that he could not find the cause for Reno disobeying orders as no one could figure it out.
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Reno deliberately destroyed the perfect battle plan on the Rosebud, and then the fall back plan had to be created which now shows horrid faults in General Terry had a fast moving 7th Cavalry depending upon in a huge area a slow moving infantry under Col. Gibbon having to march an incredible distance on the Big Horn River to rendezvous.
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President Grant's actions reveal a forethought in immediately blaming General Custer for a massacre which Grant as the most gifted of tacticians in military tactics had set up with General Sherman.
General Alfred Terry, a complete novice on Indian warfare was placed in command. General Crook had just completed a disastrous winter campaign. Col. Gibbons was an invalid who was reported ill leading infantry and a very disgruntled 2nd Cavalry unfit for duty.

These 3 groups were to unite against a hostile and more mobile Indian force over hundreds of miles in the summer when for the preceding 11 years all summer campaigns had proven immense wastes of resources and often deadly to the United States military.

All of this was set in motion at the undertaking of President Grant.

Thee only commander in the field capable of leading and fighting the Indians was relegated to a junior position, kept in Washington too late, encumbered in making plans and then sent out knowingly on his own as General Custer related in official orders and to his officers, "That the 7th Cavalry was to go out as lightly armed as possible to initiate an attack upon them from the Indians so they would not flee. The 7th Cavalry was to either defeat the hostiles or it would be defeated as not even a superior force aided by the 2nd Cavalry would make a difference."

These are the official orders and all of the facts for an inquest.

It should be noted on certain points that certainties do exist. Maj. Reno and Capt. Benteen were never sanctioned for their misconduct and operated under full protection of their commanders including those in Washington. It was the US Officer Corps which finally took it's justice on these two individuals in court martials on other matters as many of the men who died with General Custer were the sons of officers in the US military who chose to be in the 7th as it was the best fighting force in the world and General Custer was known as the best officer in looking out for his troops.
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It should be noted on certain points that certainties do exist. Maj. Reno and Capt. Benteen were never sanctioned for their misconduct and operated under full protection of their commanders including those in Washington.
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It should be noted in what can be God's recompense that just like when General Custer was court martialled in Kansas for the failure of General Hancock's military campaign against the southern tribes as a cover up, that as those accusers all were either arrested as drunks and court martialled in time that indeed the same course occurred for Benteen and Reno. President Grant would go bankrupt and then soon die of throat cancer.
Added to the recompense, Lt. George Wallace would face years later the Sioux again, this time with the 7th Cavalry in having superior numbers, but this time the whisperer of the Little Big Horn would be one of the few that died instead of the many Custer's who were slaughtered.

Legions had a great deal at stake in the assassination of General Custer from the profiteers who are still part of the ruling elite today who were taking the Indian's last robes for guns and making money off of supplying the military for a war they were fomenting  to President Grant's malevolence.
Benteen's own letter compared to Lt. Varnum's in Varnum lamenting the loss of the Custer's to Benteen's focus on advancement all point to an acting out of characters for mutual benefit and protection.

The shadow of the Indian Ring

shadowManOnBlue2.jpgThe inquest must look at the evidence and then ask the questions and search for evidence in questions of:
1. Did the Indian Ring which is still in profiteering mode under different names today conceive with President Grant's knowledge to create a disaster upon the plains with the effect being the death of their Truthful nemesis General Custer and in return a profitable war chest which would benefit all the military commanders?
2. Did placing failed and inexperienced commanders who were incapable of aiding General Custer have any original orders revealing a pattern in the Grant Administration?
3. Do any records exist in bank drafts or comments now which would come to light which would expose a coup de ta in the works for rank or financial gain in General Custer's two wing commanders Maj. Reno and Capt. Benteen being as Joab on orders from King David to place Uriah in the heat of the battle and then withdrawing from him to certain assassination.

General Nelson Appleton Miles stated it is an easy thing to kick a dead lion. The above facts when clouded by Indian hatred and liberal hatred against George Armstrong Custer coupled with propaganda and lies of people who benefited from this death all point it has been far too easy to assassinate the most gallant officer in the history of the United States by hiding it in the murderous rampage of  Indians who willingly took the blame for actions instigated by their leaders in Crazy Horse and Sitting Bull too which had the Indians murdered too.

In conclusion with the above evidence, I ask the Coroner to review, that it was public knowledge from Elizabeth Custer herself that if any of the Custer's were ever in a hopeless situation with an Indian attack that they would execute themselves or in Elizabeth's case her cavalry protectors would become her executioners, to avoid the horrid torture of having body parts cut off, gang raped in women's cases, tendons cut, pulled and removed and torture by fire to death.
Fred Grant, the President's own son would know of this as he was a Custer family intimate until he was arrested by General Custer for drunkenness on the Black Hills Expedition of which he was a part in 1874 and showing malice lied to the press afterwards to call General Custer a liar that "no gold was in the Black Hills". From the millions of dollars since mined we know the Grant family to be liars and of malicious attitude toward General Custer as were the published accounts of Capt. Frederick Benteen.


So, it is fact, that all of thee above knowing that no enemies hand could ever extinguish the "son of the morning star" that it would befall General Custer, not in suicide, but in his known deep affection for his wife in not putting her through the vivid realization that her husband was tortured to death for hours, would in love draw his own ivory pistol and in a last shot end his life more quickly as his wound in his chest which evidence shows would only keep General Custer alive only long enough to suffer incredible torture. In ending his life, his character would be to spare Elizabeth from further anguish over a lingering death.

This was common knowledge in the 7th Cavalry, among the Custer military commanding family up to Washington, including President and Fred Grant. If the Indians did not deal the death blow, then General Custer out of love for his wife would be forced to deal the blow.
The chest wound causing lingering death and the temple would causing certain death, with the General's body not mutilated as Col. Richard Irving Dodge wrote, was evidence of a self inflicted death as Indians did not mutilate those in suicide.
General Custer and his troops did fight more than bravely and sold out hard, but the Indians only administered the wound which the General Custer enemies knew in delaying to come to his defense as ordered would force General Custer to administer death himself.
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General Custer and his troops did fight more than bravely and sold out hard, but the Indians only administered the wound which the General Custer enemies knew in delaying to come to his defense as ordered would force General Custer to administer death himself.
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Those are the facts and all of the forensic evidence points to a guilt on the part of several participants who gained from the death of General Custer, lied in blaming him for the massacre and covered up the evidence of their own hands in causing the disaster for the charge of homicide to be issued.


The Coroners Inquest must be initiated and not by the same political operatives nor ignorants of past and present, but only those who are willing to deal in the facts which in forensic evidence all point to a cooperative action by leaders of the United States and sub leaders in the 7th Cavalry for the planned assassination of General George Armstrong Custer.


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