Lieutenant Gibson's personal letter

Publié le par custerwest

Inspired by a love of history and its amazing accounts of human endeavor, model making and dramatic representations of the people, places and things that have shaped our culture.

The cover-up of the betrayal of the Little Bighorn needed all kind of changes…
ALTERATION OF A PERSONAL LETTER img-thing.jpg
  Sources: Louise Barnett, Touched by Fire…, page 335; Captain Michael J. Koury, Diaries of Little Bighorn, page 11; Katherine Fougera, With Custer’s cavalry, page 269.
 
On July 4, 1876, Lieutenant Francis Gibson, of Benteen’s H company, wrote a letter to his wife Katherine and explained the Battle of the Little Bighorn: «We heard Custer’s command fighting about three miles off, in our front, but it was impossible for us to join him as we could neither abandon our wounded men nor the packs of the whole command.”
 
This “explanation” is contradicted by Lieutenant Edward Gofrey, of G company:  “I thought General Custer was below us and we could join him that we gad no water and a few wounded; that we would have our casualties and burdens increased on the morrow.”
 
Gibson’s explanation of the behaviour of both Benteen and Reno was in fact an unconvincing lie and the betrayal was thus easily unmasked. Changes had to be made to cover the criminal affair up.
 
Again, the original letter of 1876:

We heard Custer’s command fighting about three miles off, in our front, but it was impossible for us to join him as we could neither abandon our wounded men nor the packs of the whole command.”
 
Here is the final reproduction of Gibson’s letter in the book With Custer’s cavalry (1942), compiled by his daughter Katherine Gibson Fougera : 
 
We heard Custer’s command fighting about five miles off, in our front, and we tried repeatedly, but in vain, to join him.”
 
The revisionism was complete.


- Lieutenant Francis Gibson -

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ui 19/12/2016 05:39

Ghey