Crazy Horse and Gall

Publié le par custerwest

Inspired by a love of history and its amazing accounts of human endeavor, model making and dramatic representations of the people, places and things that have shaped our culture.The story of how Chiefs Gall's and Crazy Horse's stories of Custer's Last Stand were changed
FAVOR THE FRIEND

 
Gall's own testimony: during Custer's Last Stand, Chief Gall, Sioux hunkpapa, was looking for his daughters and wives in the valley. He never fought Major Reno's column and joined the battle when Custer reached Medicine Tail Ford, near the village.

Crazy Horse's actions at Little Bighorn according to his followers: when Major Reno attacked the village, Crazy Horse went to his teepee, invoked the spirits, got his weapons and attacked Reno in the timber. He fought Reno, and then Custer, all day long.

That is what the two chiefs said. Nevertheless, we now read in countless books and articles that Gall did in fact fight Reno and that Crazy Horse was not involved in the battle with Reno!

How could we get such false claims? It is simple. In the reservation, Chief Gall was a model of integration, a man who quickly became the best friend of the Whites. He was known to be charming, with huge charisma and intelligence. The Americans appreciated his efforts to learn the basics of modern society.

In the contrary, Chief Crazy Horse refused to speak English, lived in his teepee and was known by the Americans as being a possible troublemaker. He was utterly hated by many officers, Indian agents and White civilians.

What happened was thus simple: when writing about the battle, General Godfrey, Little Bighorn veteran and Gall's best friend, made it all about Chief Gall. Gall got all the actions that Crazy Horse did even though he was claiming that he had not done it.

As of today, most of the Sioux relatives, historians and Little Bighorn buffs continue to credit Chief Gall of having let the fight against Major Reno and Crazy Horse of having been late in the battle...

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