Captain Thomas Benton Weir

Publié le par custerwest

Inspired by a love of history and its amazing accounts of human endeavor, model making and dramatic representations of the people, places and things that have shaped our culture.

New custerwest video: Captain Thomas Weir tried to stop the betrayal of Little Bighorn 
DUTY MATTERS

 
"The legacy of heroes--the memory of a great name, and the inheritance of a great example."     
Benjamin Disraeli 

Thomas Benton Weir (1838-1876)

United States Army Officer. He attended school in Albion, Michigan, and graduated from the University of Michigan in June 1861. He enlisted August 27, 1861 in Company B, 3rd Michigan Volunteer Cavalry, and was rapidly promoted to First Sergeant. 

Promoted to 2nd Lieutenant on October 13, 1861, he fought at New Madrid, siege of Corinth, Farmington, Iuka, Coffeeville, and the second battle of Corinth. Appointed First Lieutenant on June 19, 1862, he was taken prisoner by Confederates on June 26, 1862. Released on January 8, 1863, he rejoined his unit, but had been appointed Captain, November 1, 1862, while still a prisoner. 

He then served as Assistant Inspector General on the staff of Major General George Custer (his future commanding officer in the 7th Cavalry after the war). Brevetted Major, US Volunteers on January 18, 1865 and to Lieutenant Colonel, US Volunteers on July 31, 1867, in the realignment of the United States Army after the Civil War, he was appointed Captain, 7th US Cavalry, on July 31, 1867.
 
He served during the Indian Wars as Captain and commander of Company D, 7th United States Regular Cavalry, which he led during the Battle of the Little Big Horn. Assigned to Major Marcus Reno's Battalion during the battle, he survived the fight, but he is reported to have drunk himself to death from his remorse over losing his commanding officer, General George A. Custer, whom he thought highly of. 

Let a message on the grave of the Hero of Little Bighorn
Click here for the whole story of Captain Weir's several attempts to stop the betrayal at Little Bighorn

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